Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2019, Page: 33-36
Prevalence of Anti Erythocyte Alloimmunization to Sub-Saharan African Blood Donors
Sekongo Yassongui Mamadou, National Blood Transfusion Center of Côte D’Ivoire, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Dasse Sery Romuald, Hospitality and University Center of Cocody, Abidjan, Côte D’Ivoire
Altemeyer Anaïs, Transfusion Swiss Red Cross Switzerland, Laupenstrasse, Switzerland
Soraya Amar, Transfusion Swiss Red Cross Switzerland, Laupenstrasse, Switzerland
Tayou Claude, Haematology and Blood Transfusion Service of University Teaching Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon
Anani Ludovic, Blood Transfusion Agency of Benin, Benin, Nigeria
Kassogue Kadidia, National Blood Transfusion Center of Côte D’Ivoire, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Geisen Cristof, Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology, Frankfurt, Germany
Herbrich Anne, Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology, Frankfurt, Germany
Kouamenan Sisonie, National Blood Transfusion Center of Côte D’Ivoire, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Konate Seidou, National Blood Transfusion Center of Côte D’Ivoire, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Received: May 4, 2019;       Accepted: Aug. 23, 2019;       Published: Sep. 6, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.iji.20190702.12      View  26      Downloads  8
Abstract
A part from any incompatible blood transfusion, anti-erythrocyte alloimmunization is observed to pregnant women. It is the result of the passage of red blood cells carrying antigens different from those of the mother during pregnancy and delivery. The Rhesus D system is the most involved; but there are also other systems involved in this alloimmunization. Non-transfusion alloimmunization is an extremely rare event in the order of 1 of 4000 to women in Europe and in most cases concerns the Rhesus D. In sub-Saharan Africa, there are no statistics collected on foeto-maternal alloimmunization. As part of our postgraduate thesis on the sensitization status of red blood cells to acridine, we used the technique of looking for irregular agglutinins. The goal was to find anti-erythrocyte alloimmunization to blood donors in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a two-year multicenter prospective and descriptive study of 903 blood donors in Côte d'Ivoire, Benin and Cameroon. The samples were analyzed in the laboratories of the National Blood Transfusion Center of Côte D'Ivoire and Frankfurt according to the technique of the RAI gel card of the BIORAD company after centrifugation and incubation using test red cells treated with S-303. In the case of a positive reaction, identification is made by a panel of red blood cells in the different blood group systems. In our study population, there is a male predominance with a male/female ratio of 7.42. We found a very low prevalence of alloimmunization to non-transfused blood donors (0.9% or 8 cases out of 902). 4 anti-erythrocyte antibodies have been identified (1 Ac anti D and 3 AC anti S); 2 pan-agglutination, 2 unidentified Ac (insufficient serum) and suspicion of anti-glutathione. Anti-erythrocyte alloimmunization to sub-Saharan Africa blood donor is about 0.9% in our series. It remains high compared to European data. This alloimmunization is mainly observed to women with low frequency antigens to black peoples.
Keywords
Antierythrocyte, Alloimmization, Subsaharian, Blood Donor
To cite this article
Sekongo Yassongui Mamadou, Dasse Sery Romuald, Altemeyer Anaïs, Soraya Amar, Tayou Claude, Anani Ludovic, Kassogue Kadidia, Geisen Cristof, Herbrich Anne, Kouamenan Sisonie, Konate Seidou, Prevalence of Anti Erythocyte Alloimmunization to Sub-Saharan African Blood Donors, International Journal of Immunology. Vol. 7, No. 2, 2019, pp. 33-36. doi: 10.11648/j.iji.20190702.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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